Essay: 2021 is the WORST year in the history of atheism

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2021 is the WORST year in the history of atheism.

2020 was a HORRIBLE year for atheism and now this!

See also: 2020 was a very bad year for atheism. VERY, VERY BAD. HORRIBLE

Why 2021 is the WORST year in the history of atheism

Map of East Asia.

The current atheist population mostly resides in East Asia (particularly China) and in secular Europe/Australia among whites.[1] See: Global atheism and Atheist population and Asian atheism

China and 2021

Please read the article: Future of atheism in China

China has the world's largest atheist population and practices state atheism. China has one of the highest rates of atheism in the world. The most secular nations in the world are those of East Asia. It is likely therefore that the majority of the world’s atheists are East Asian. There are signs that just like state atheism collapsed in the former Soviet Union, state atheism will collapse in China.

The current signs that China's real estate bubble will soon burst is one of the indications that atheist controlled Chinese Communist Party is on its way out or at the very least will have far less influence on its citizens in the next 25 years.

Given that most atheists in the world are East Asians, 2021 is the WORST year in the history of atheism!

Secular Europe and 2021

The coronavirus pandemic is being blamed for the falling birth rates across much of secular Europe.[2] In March of 2021, it was reported the more Europeans were dying from Covid-19 than last year.[3]

Europe is dying both numerically and culturally (More people in Europe are dying than are being born).[4][5][6] The United Nations has said the number of people in the European Union bloc will drop to 365 million by 2100, down from 446 million today. But a 2020 study, published in the medical journal The Lancet, predicts it will fall more sharply, to 308 million by the end of the century.[7]

Since secular Europe has the second largest atheist population in the world, 2021 is the WORST year in the history of atheism.

2020 was also a very BAD year for atheism (see: 2020 was a very bad year for atheism. VERY, VERY BAD. HORRIBLE).

Professor Eric Kaufmann, who teaches at Birkbeck College, University of London, specializes in the academic area of how demographic changes affect religion/irreligion and politics. Kaufmann is an agnostic.

On December 23, 2012, Kaufmann wrote:

I argue that 97% of the world's population growth is taking place in the developing world, where 95% of people are religious.

On the other hand, the secular West and East Asia has very low fertility and a rapidly aging population... In the coming decades, the developed world's demand for workers to pay its pensions and work in its service sector will soar alongside the booming supply of young people in the third world. Ergo, we can expect significant immigration to the secular West which will import religious revival on the back of ethnic change. In addition, those with religious beliefs tend to have higher birth rates than the secular population, with fundamentalists having far larger families. The epicentre of these trends will be in immigration gateway cities like New York (a third white), Amsterdam (half Dutch), Los Angeles (28% white), and London, 45% white British.[8] [9]

The future of Christianity is very bright. On behalf of all Christendom, I declare victory! Olé! Olé! Olé!

See also: Future of Christianity

The prominent historian Sir Diarmaid MacCulloch, professor of the History of the Church at Oxford University, indicates that he believes Christianity faces a "bright future" worldwide (See also: Global Christianity).

According to MacCulloch, "Christianity, the world's largest religion, is rapidly expanding – by all indications, its future is very bright."[10]

The prominent historian Sir Diarmaid MacCulloch, professor of the History of the Church at Oxford University, indicates that he believes Christianity faces a "bright future" worldwide (See also: Global Christianity).

According to MacCulloch, "Christianity, the world's largest religion, is rapidly expanding – by all indications, its future is very bright."[11]

In 2012, the Center for the Study of Global Christianity at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary (GCTS) reported that every day there are 83,000 more people professing to be Christians per day, 800 less atheists per day, 1,100 less non-religious (agnostic) people per day.[12][13]

Phillip Jenkins published the book The Next Christendom: The Coming of Global Christianity.

Chuck Colson, citing the work of Jenkins, writes:

As Penn State professor Philip Jenkins writes in The Next Christendom: The Coming of Global Christianity, predictions like Huntingtons betray an ignorance of the explosive growth of Christianity outside of the West.

For instance, in 1900, there were approximately 10 million Christians in Africa. By 2000, there were 360 million. By 2025, conservative estimates see that number rising to 633 million. Those same estimates put the number of Christians in Latin America in 2025 at 640 million and in Asia at 460 million.

According to Jenkins, the percentage of the worlds population that is, at least by name, Christian will be roughly the same in 2050 as it was in 1900. By the middle of this century, there will be three billion Christians in the world -- one and a half times the number of Muslims. In fact, by 2050 there will be nearly as many Pentecostal Christians in the world as there are Muslims today.[14]

As much as I hate to say it, on behalf of all Christendom, I declare victory! Olé! Olé! Olé!

Religion and its projected increase in the 22nd century

See also: Religion and its projected increase in the 22nd century

In 2012, the W. Edwards Deming Institute published a report by the World Future Society which indicated:

In 2100, however, the world will likely be only 9% unaffiliated — more religious than in 2012. The peak of the unaffiliated was in 1970 at around 20%, largely due to the influence of European communism. Since communism’s collapse, religion has been experiencing resurgence that will likely continue beyond 2100. All the world’s religions are poised to have enormous numeric growth (with the exceptions of tribal religions and Chinese folk religion), as well as geographic spread with the continuation of migration trends. Adherents of the world’s religions—perhaps particularly Muslims, Hindus, and Buddhists—will continue to settle in the formerly Christian and ever-expanding cities of Europe and North America, causing increases of religious pluralism in these areas. Christians and Muslims together will encompass two-thirds of the global population—more than 7 billion individuals. In 2100, the majority of the world’s 11.6 billion residents will be adherents of religious traditions.[15]

Pew Research indicates: "By 2055 to 2060, just 9% of all babies will be born to religiously unaffiliated women, while more than seven-in-ten will be born to either Muslims (36%) or Christians (35%)."[16]

In 2011, Eric Kaufmann wrote in his academic paper Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth?: Demography and Politics in the Twenty-First Century

Today, values play a more important role in fertility behaviour, throwing the contrast between religious pronatalism and secular low-fertility individualism into relief. Over several generations, this process can lead to significant social and political changes. Early Christianity’s exponential rise during its gestation period from 30 to 300 A.D. has been traced to its superior demography (fertility, mortality and female sex ratio), which maintained a rate of growth similar to contemporary Mormonism: 40 percent per decade. For Christians, this led to a jump from 40 converts to 6 million inside three centuries. (Stark 1996) Christianity became the religion of an empire and a continent. In the United States, conservative sects increased their share of white Protestantism from roughly a third to two-thirds during the twentieth century – largely on the back of higher fertility. On the other hand, sects like the Shakers and Cathars, which permitted entry only through conversion, rapidly faded from the scene. Demographic religious revival is a medium and long-term phenomenon, but awareness of shifting population composition can lead to political soul-searching and instability well before the full impact of demographic change takes place. This is clear in ethnically-tense societies like Israel, Northern Ireland, Bosnia, Lebanon, Cote D’Ivoire or Assam.[17]

See also: Atheism and fertility rates and Acceleration of 21st century desecularization

Atheism is in decline worldwide, with the number of atheists falling from 4.5% of the world's population in 1970 to 2.0% in 2010 and it was projected to drop to 1.8% by 2020.[18] See: Global atheism statistics

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Notes

  1. A surprising map of where the world’s atheists live, By Max Fisher and Caitlin Dewey, Washington Post, May 23, 2013
  2. Europe, US births slump amid pandemic: UN, The West Australian
  3. More Europeans Dying from COVID Now Than Last Year, WHO Says
  4. Is Europe dying?, Healthcare in Europe, 2016
  5. Europe Is Dying, New Book Warns, And The Consequences Could Be Dire For The West, The Federalist, 2018
  6. Europe Is Dying, The American Conservative, 2018
  7. New study forecasts the EU's population will plummet by millions more than expected, Euronews, 2020
  8. London: A Rising Island of Religion in a Secular Sea by Eric Kaufmann, Huffington Post, 2012
  9. 97% of the world's population growth is taking place in the developing world, where 95% of people are religious, Tuesday, April 30, 2013
  10. Historian predicts 'bright future' for Christianity
  11. Historian predicts 'bright future' for Christianity
  12. Globally the worldviews of atheism and non-religious (agnostic) are declining while global Christianity is exploding in adherents
  13. Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary - Status of Global Missions
  14. How Christianity is Growing Around the World by Chuck Colson
  15. The 22nd Century at First Light: Envisioning Life in the Year 2100: A special report by members and friends of the World Future Society, Religious Belief in 2100 by Gina A. Bellofatto
  16. The Changing Global Religious Landscape, Pew Research 2017
  17. Shall the Religious Inherit the Earth?: Demography and Politics in the Twenty-First Century by Eric Kaufmann, Belfer Center, Harvard University/Birkbeck College, University of London (PDF)
  18. Global Study: Atheists in Decline, Only 1.8% of World Population by 2020