Henry Cuellar

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Enrique Roberto “Henry” Cuellar
Henry Cuellar official portrait.jpg
U.S. Representative from Texas's 28th Congressional District
From: January 3, 2005 – present
Predecessor Ciro Rodriguez
Successor Incumbent (no successor)
Former Secretary of State of Texas
From: January 2, 2001 – October 5, 2001
Predecessor Elton Bomer
Successor Gwyn Shea
Former State Representative from Texas's 42nd District
From: 1993–2001
Predecessor ???
Successor Richard Raymond
Former State Representative from Texas's 43rd District
From: 1987–1993
Predecessor William N. "Billy" Hall, Jr.
Successor ???
Information
Party Democrat
Spouse(s) Imelda Cuellar
Religion Roman Catholic[1]

Enrique Roberto Cuellar (born September 19, 1955), known as Henry Cuellar (pron. KWAY AR), is the Democrat U.S. Representative for Texas' 28th congressional district, which reaches from part of San Antonio as far south as Starr County. A cultural conservative on some issues, Cuellar has described himself as being:[2]

...centrist, basically, I vote my district.

Popular in his district for many years, Cuellar is known as the "King of Laredo" for his public role in his hometown.[3] However, he faces opposition in both party primaries in the 2022 U.S. House election in Texas' 28th district. Cuellar voted for both impeachments of former U.S. President Donald Trump in 2020 and 2021 as well as the Democrat spending bills.

U.S. House of Representatives

Cuellar was re-elected in 2020, defeating Republican opponent Sandra Whitten by nearly twenty percentage points in the traditionally safe blue district.[4] In the concurrent presidential race, Joe Biden only edged out a 4-point victory[5] in the same congressional district as Donald Trump made significant inroads in appealing to Texas Latino voters.[6] While Biden ran as a left-wing Democrat, Cuellar maintained a comparably more independent streak in his record.

In late September 2021, Cuellar was the only House Democrat to vote against a pro-abortion bill that seeks to override the Texas Heartbeat Act.[7]

Biden border crisis

See also: Biden border crisis

After White House chief propagandist Jen Psaki denied a border crisis existed,[8] the Biden junta put Kamala Harris in charge of managing the catastrophe.[9] Harris previously compared Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials to the Ku Klux Klan.[10] Harris refused to visit the border for six months and laughed at the unfolding human tragedy.[11]

When Harris visited Guatemala and Mexico, she said that if you want to fix a problem, you have to go to where the problem is and listen to the people. “I almost believe that if you want to fix a problem, you have to go where the problem exists,” Harris declares. “If you want to address the needs of a people, you must meet those people. You must spend time with those people. Because the only way to fix the problem, is to understand the problem.”

Cuellar had been calling for months for the Biden junta to listen to the people in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, to him, and to law enforcement that is overwhelmed called Harris' visit to El Paso in the Upper Rio Rio Grande Valley a “politically safe” trip, a “check the box” kind of trip. Harris never consulted with Cuellar, Texas Governor Greg Abbott, or other local people.[12]

On March 1, 2022, Cuellar faces a rematch with his 2020 primary opponent, Jessica Cisneros, who came within 2,700 votes of unseating the veteran Democratic representative.[13] Another leftist candidate in the primary is Tannya Benavides, an educator,and community organizer, and devotee of the communist group Black Lives Matter. Meanwhile, five Republicans are contesting their primary, including the 2020 general election nominee, Sandra Whitten.

References

  1. Religious affiliation of members of 116th Congress. Pew Research Center. Retrieved September 26, 2021.
  2. Soellner, Mica (August 13, 2021). ‘I vote my district’: Blue Dog Democrat Henry Cuellar doesn’t cave to liberal pressure. Washington Times. Retrieved September 26, 2021.
  3. Bova, Gus (November 23, 2021). Jessica Cisneros Takes Her Second Shot at the King of Laredo. Texas Observer. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  4. Texas Election Results: 28th Congressional District. The New York Times. Archived version available here. Retrieved September 26, 2021.
  5. Wassermann, David; Flinn, Ally (April 15, 2021). Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index. The Cook Political Report. Retrieved September 26, 2021.
  6. Herrera, Jack (November 17, 2020). Trump Didn’t Win the Latino Vote in Texas. He Won the Tejano Vote.. Politico. Retrieved September 26, 2021.
  7. Irvine, Bethany; Livingston, Abby (September 24, 2021). U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar of Texas is lone Democrat to vote against federal bill protecting abortion rights. The Texas Tribune. Retrieved September 26, 2021.
  8. https://nypost.com/2021/03/09/wh-refuses-to-call-mexico-border-rush-child-detainment-a-crisis/
  9. https://redstate.com/nick-arama/2021/03/24/biden-just-named-a-new-person-in-charge-of-the-border-youll-know-her-by-the-sound-of-her-cackle-n349562
  10. https://www.lawenforcementtoday.com/kamala-harris-tapped-to-fix-the-border-despite-attacking-immigration/
  11. https://www.bizpacreview.com/2021/03/23/kamala-harris-bursts-out-awkward-laugh-when-asked-about-visiting-the-border-not-today-1048624/
  12. https://redstate.com/nick-arama/2021/06/24/border-dem-busts-the-real-reason-kamala-is-going-to-el-paso-border-area-n401824
  13. Panetta, Grace; Scher, Isaac (March 4, 2020). Rep. Henry Cuellar fends off AOC-backed progressive challenger Jessica Cisneros in Texas' 28th district. Business Insider. Retrieved December 3, 2021.