Difference between revisions of "Rush Limbaugh"

From Conservapedia
Jump to: navigation, search
(add details and bibliog)
(Radio)
Line 5: Line 5:
 
Limbaugh started young. By the age of seventeen, he was already a dedicated disc jockey, hosting a radio show in his hometown of Cape Girardeau, Missouri.  He dropped out of college after his freshman year to pursue work full-time as a DJ, and got his big break in 1984, when KFBK in Sacramento hired him to host a talk show that reveled in controversy about conservative politics. His program was widely syndicated and by 1994 he was the number one talk-show host in the country. In 2001, he re-negotiated his contract for eight more years, for $285 million, a radio record. Surgery overcame a disease that left him nearly deaf in 2001.
 
Limbaugh started young. By the age of seventeen, he was already a dedicated disc jockey, hosting a radio show in his hometown of Cape Girardeau, Missouri.  He dropped out of college after his freshman year to pursue work full-time as a DJ, and got his big break in 1984, when KFBK in Sacramento hired him to host a talk show that reveled in controversy about conservative politics. His program was widely syndicated and by 1994 he was the number one talk-show host in the country. In 2001, he re-negotiated his contract for eight more years, for $285 million, a radio record. Surgery overcame a disease that left him nearly deaf in 2001.
  
Limbaugh hosts a radio show famed for its incisive criticism of the follies of liberalism. He is often at odds with liberal activist [[Al Franken]], who wrote a book entitled ''"Rush Limbaugh Is a Big Fat Idiot". Limbaugh habitually refers to [[feminists]] who support [[abortion]] as ''feminazis'' and to his own self as having "talent on loan from God".  Sensitive about his own schooling, he ridicules the college educated as the "Arts & Croissant Crowd."  
+
Limbaugh hosts a radio show famed for its incisive criticism of the follies of liberalism. He is often at odds with liberal activist [[Al Franken]], who counterattacked with a book entitled ''"Rush Limbaugh Is a Big Fat Idiot''. Limbaugh habitually refers to [[feminists]] who support [[abortion]] as ''feminazis'' and to his own self as having "talent on loan from God".  Sensitive about his own schooling, he ridicules the college educated as the "Arts & Croissant Crowd."  
  
 
Limbaugh's style has been credited with "reviving AM radio in the United States, and is considered by many to have been a catalyst for the [[Republican Party]]'s 1994 Congressional victories"<ref>[http://select.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F10813FA3B5D0C708EDDAB0894DE494D81&n=Top%2fReference%2fTimes%20Topics%2fPeople%2fL%2fLimbaugh%2c%20Rush Radio Talk Show Host Fears For True Conservatism's Fate], New York Times</ref>.
 
Limbaugh's style has been credited with "reviving AM radio in the United States, and is considered by many to have been a catalyst for the [[Republican Party]]'s 1994 Congressional victories"<ref>[http://select.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F10813FA3B5D0C708EDDAB0894DE494D81&n=Top%2fReference%2fTimes%20Topics%2fPeople%2fL%2fLimbaugh%2c%20Rush Radio Talk Show Host Fears For True Conservatism's Fate], New York Times</ref>.
Line 17: Line 17:
  
 
Republican National Chairman Michael Steele called Limbaugh an "entertainer" whose comments were "incendiary" and "ugly," and Limbaugh counterattacked Steele's fitness to run the party.  A Gallup poll in May 2009 on who was the main voice of the GOP found Limbaugh leading the pack at 13%, with Steele trailing at 1%.
 
Republican National Chairman Michael Steele called Limbaugh an "entertainer" whose comments were "incendiary" and "ugly," and Limbaugh counterattacked Steele's fitness to run the party.  A Gallup poll in May 2009 on who was the main voice of the GOP found Limbaugh leading the pack at 13%, with Steele trailing at 1%.
 +
 
==Audience==
 
==Audience==
 
Conservative Republicans are in his audience, but educational attainment, family income, and race do not predict who listens. Listening to Limbaugh is significantly correlated with public affairs information.  He is not merely an entertainer and people who listen to him regularly are very well informed on public affairs.  However, his radio audience is smaller than the TV audiences of  conservative commentators [[Bill O'Reilly]] and [[Sean Hannity]].<ref> Stephen Earl Bennett, " Who Listens to Rush Limbaugh's Radio Program and the Relationship Between Listening to Limbaugh and Knowledge of Public Affairs, 1994-2006," ''Journal of Radio & Audio Media,'' May 2009, Vol. 16 Issue 1, p66-82, in [[EBSCO]]</ref>  
 
Conservative Republicans are in his audience, but educational attainment, family income, and race do not predict who listens. Listening to Limbaugh is significantly correlated with public affairs information.  He is not merely an entertainer and people who listen to him regularly are very well informed on public affairs.  However, his radio audience is smaller than the TV audiences of  conservative commentators [[Bill O'Reilly]] and [[Sean Hannity]].<ref> Stephen Earl Bennett, " Who Listens to Rush Limbaugh's Radio Program and the Relationship Between Listening to Limbaugh and Knowledge of Public Affairs, 1994-2006," ''Journal of Radio & Audio Media,'' May 2009, Vol. 16 Issue 1, p66-82, in [[EBSCO]]</ref>  

Revision as of 22:57, 26 December 2009

Rush Limbaugh

Rush Limbaugh (born January 12, 1951) is a conservative American radio talk show host and author. Limbaugh has risen to the top of the ratings heap as an intensely conservative voice in a talk radio media environment dominated by conservatives. In his sharp criticisms of the Obama Administration Limbaugh secured his position as one of the de facto leaders of the Republican opposition. Historians compare his role to Walter Winchell, a radio commentator of the 1930s-1950s era.

Radio

Limbaugh started young. By the age of seventeen, he was already a dedicated disc jockey, hosting a radio show in his hometown of Cape Girardeau, Missouri. He dropped out of college after his freshman year to pursue work full-time as a DJ, and got his big break in 1984, when KFBK in Sacramento hired him to host a talk show that reveled in controversy about conservative politics. His program was widely syndicated and by 1994 he was the number one talk-show host in the country. In 2001, he re-negotiated his contract for eight more years, for $285 million, a radio record. Surgery overcame a disease that left him nearly deaf in 2001.

Limbaugh hosts a radio show famed for its incisive criticism of the follies of liberalism. He is often at odds with liberal activist Al Franken, who counterattacked with a book entitled "Rush Limbaugh Is a Big Fat Idiot. Limbaugh habitually refers to feminists who support abortion as feminazis and to his own self as having "talent on loan from God". Sensitive about his own schooling, he ridicules the college educated as the "Arts & Croissant Crowd."

Limbaugh's style has been credited with "reviving AM radio in the United States, and is considered by many to have been a catalyst for the Republican Party's 1994 Congressional victories"[1]. Limbaugh's conservative talk show is nationally syndicated and averages over 16 million listeners weekly, making him the #1 radio talk show host in America. [2] In July 2008, Rush announced "he has renewed his contract with Premiere Radio Networks and Clear Channel Radio, continuing syndication of his show 'many years into the future.'" [3]

Obama to Fail

Limbaugh made national headlines when he was asked to write 400 words for a newspaper column about Obama's plans. He said he didn't need 400 words, he needed just four: "I hope he fails." He immediately came under attack as an unpatriotic obstructionist. What Limbaugh actually said, as opposed to the MSM shortened version flashed everywhere, according to the show's transcript was, if Obama is for socialist policies and against capitalist policies, of course he could not support those policies, and hoped he would fail. [4]

Limbaugh addressed CPAC and further discussed his stance that generated so much attention. [5]

"Did the Democrats want the war in Iraq to fail? Well, they certainly did. And they not only wanted the war in Iraq to fail, they proclaimed it a failure. ... The last thing they wanted was to win. They hoped George Bush failed. So where is it -- what is so strange about being honest and saying, I want Barack Obama to fail if his mission is to restructure and reform this country so that capitalism and individual liberty are not its foundation? Why would I want that to succeed?"

Republican National Chairman Michael Steele called Limbaugh an "entertainer" whose comments were "incendiary" and "ugly," and Limbaugh counterattacked Steele's fitness to run the party. A Gallup poll in May 2009 on who was the main voice of the GOP found Limbaugh leading the pack at 13%, with Steele trailing at 1%.

Audience

Conservative Republicans are in his audience, but educational attainment, family income, and race do not predict who listens. Listening to Limbaugh is significantly correlated with public affairs information. He is not merely an entertainer and people who listen to him regularly are very well informed on public affairs. However, his radio audience is smaller than the TV audiences of conservative commentators Bill O'Reilly and Sean Hannity.[6]

The Harry Reid Letter

On October 2, 2007, Senator Harry Reid, D-NV, wrote a letter to Mark P. Mays, President and CEO of Clear Channel Communications, who is Rush Limbaugh's chief patron. In it Senator Reid essentially demanded that Mr. Mays order Mr. Limbaugh to apologize for remarks he made concerning "phony soldiers."[7] A phony soldier is someone who is not a soldier at all but is pretending to be one, especially in a public forum. Such activity is unlawful, and the person whose activity prompted Mr. Limbaugh's remarks has since been convicted and punished.[8]

This letter was co-signed by nearly all Democratic senators. In a speech in Philadelphia on October 11th, Limbaugh announced plans to sell the original letter on eBay in a charity auction. The proceeds went to the Marine Corps Law Enforcement Foundation. The letter sold for $2.1 million and Limbaugh matched the winning amount with a total of $.2 million being donated. [9]

Politics

Limbaugh endorsed Mitt Romney for the 2008 Presidential Election. [10] He was often critical of John McCain during the Republican primaries, but supported him in the general election.

Poking fun at Obama liberals

Newsweek editor Evan Thomas said on MSNBC's "Hardball" that Obama was "sort of God."

Asking rhetorically what God has in common with Obama, Limbaugh said, "Neither has a birth certificate." [11] He went on to say "God does not think he's Obama," and "Liberals love Obama." Limbaugh explained more differences, "Another difference is that God only demands to be worshiped once a week," and "God asks for only 10 percent of your money", and "God gives you freedom to live your life as you choose."

Painkiller addiction

On October 6, 2003 Limbaugh told his audience he was addicted to OxyContin and other painkillers citing a failed back surgery as the cause of his pain and subsequent dependence. [12][13] Limbaugh underwent treatment for his addiction, and criminal charges against him for alleged "doctor shopping" to procure prescription medications were dropped on the condition that he continue treatment for his addiction.[14]

Sports

Limbaugh is an avid sports fan, particularly football. He briefly held a position as a commentator on ESPN's Sunday NFL Countdown pre-game show. He resigned from the show on October 2, 2006 after comments made regarding Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb received widespread criticism.


"I think what we've had here is a little social concern in the NFL. The media has been very desirous that a black quarterback do well. There is a little hope invested in McNabb, and he got a lot of credit for the performance of this team that he didn't deserve. The defense carried this team."

After McNabb's response, "It's sad that you've got to go to skin color. I thought we were through with that whole deal," significant pressure was put upon Limbaugh to resign. [15]

Other Media Work

The Limbaugh Letter is a monthly publication that contains conservative articles and humor in Rush's style.

Limbaugh is involved in the conservative satire show "The 1/2 Hour News Hour" show on the Fox News Channel. [16]

Rush occasionally writes op-ed pieces for the Wall Street Journal.

Quotes

  • "You know why there's a Second Amendment? In case the government fails to follow the first one." - Rush Limbaugh, 17 Aug 1993

References

  1. Radio Talk Show Host Fears For True Conservatism's Fate, New York Times
  2. The Top Talk Radio Audiences Tallkers magazine online
  3. Rush Renews Contract, Human Events, July, 2, 2008
  4. Limbaugh radio show transcript.
  5. Limbaugh the Leader? Obama Chief of Staff Fox News, March 01, 2009
  6. Stephen Earl Bennett, " Who Listens to Rush Limbaugh's Radio Program and the Relationship Between Listening to Limbaugh and Knowledge of Public Affairs, 1994-2006," Journal of Radio & Audio Media, May 2009, Vol. 16 Issue 1, p66-82, in EBSCO
  7. Reid, Harry, et al. "Letter to Mark P. Mays of Clear Channel Communications." Electronic Office of US Senator Harry Reid, October 2, 2007. Retrieved October 19, 2007.
  8. Limbaugh, Rush. "The Anatomy of a Smear: 'Phony Soldiers' Is a Phony Story." Rush Limbaugh Official Site, accessed December 25, 2007.
  9. http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/420889/harry_reidrush_limbaugh_letter_nets.html
  10. Limbaugh Endorses Romney, Melanie Hunter, CNSNews, February 05, 2008
  11. Rush Limbaugh pummels Obama on birth certificate WND, June 10, 2009
  12. The Rush Limbaugh Show, October 6, 2007.
  13. [http://www.cnn.com/2003/SHOWBIZ/10/10/rush.limbaugh/ "Limbaugh admits addiction to pain medication"
  14. http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2006/04/28/national/main1561324.shtml
  15. http://espn.go.com/gen/news/2003/1001/1628537.html
  16. Fox News Channel's '1/2 Hour News Hour': Right Funny, in Spots washingtonpost.com

See Also

External Links

Further reading

  • Gordon, Scott. Rush Limbaugh: An Oral & Media Biography (2009). 258pp quotes and comments by his friends and enemies.
  • Jamieson, Kathleen Hall, and Joseph N. Cappella. Echo Chamber: Rush Limbaugh and the Conservative Media Establishment (2008) balanced analysis by scholars; compares Limbaugh with Fox and Wall Street Journal excerpt and text search