Last modified on 2 April 2019, at 12:08

Generation Z, irreligion and obesity

In 2018, the Barna Group published an article entitled Atheism Doubles Among Generation Z.[1]

In 2017, Bingham Memorial Hospital declared:

Generation Z—those children born in the mid-2000s, after the Millennials—are facing the dangers of obesity at an alarming rate. The percentage of obese children in the United States aged 6 to 11 increased from 7 percent in 1980 to 18 percent in 2012, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). And, during the same time period, the percentage of obese teenagers aged 12 to 19 increased from 5 percent to 21 percent.

“It’s unsettling to know that childhood obesity has more than doubled in children and quadrupled in teenagers in the past 30 years,” says Karla Adams, Family Nurse Practitioner at Bingham Memorial Hospital. “But, families do have options and there is hope.”[2]

Atheism and obesity

Two of the major risk factors for becoming obese according to the Mayo Clinic are poor dietary choices and inactivity.[3] According to the Gallup Inc., "Very religious Americans are more likely to practice healthy behaviors than those who are moderately religious or nonreligious."[4]

See also: Atheism and obesity

The current atheist population mostly resides in East Asia (particularly China) and in secular Europe/Australia primarily among whites.[5] See: Global atheism and Western atheism and race

Secular Europe and communist China have significant problems with obesity (see: Secular Europe and obesity and China and obesity). In addition, Australia has a significant problem with obesity (see: Australia, irreligion and obesity).

In the United States at the present time, the greater the degree of irreligiosity in a generation, the higher their obesity rate is. According to the Gallup Inc., "Very religious Americans are more likely to practice healthy behaviors than those who are moderately religious or nonreligious."[6]

In addition, a significant number of prominent atheists are overweight (see: Atheism and obesity).

For more information, See: Atheism and obesity

See also

Notes