Last modified on May 24, 2021, at 18:44

Essay: Darwin's Law

Late in Charles Darwin's life, Darwin told the Duke of Argyll that he frequently had overwhelming thoughts that the natural world was the result of design.[1] See also: 15 questions for evolutionists

"The louder and more frequent one's objections to creationism are, the more likely one is to be a creationist." - Darwin's Law

Darwin's Law is an adage named after Charles Darwin. Late in Darwin's life, Darwin told the Duke of Argyll that he frequently had overwhelming thoughts that the natural world was the result of design.[2]

People who strongly object to creationism know there is a Creator. The Apostle Paul wrote: "For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who suppress the truth in unrighteousness, because what may be known of God is manifest in them, for God has shown it to them. For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, so that they are without excuse. For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse..." (Romans 1:19-20).

In Japan, researchers found that Japanese children see the world as designed.[3]

The American journalist Heywood Broun (1888 - 1939) made a similar observation about atheists when he wrote, "Nobody talks so constantly about God as those who insist there is no God."[4]

See also

Notes

  1. Teleological arguments, Standford University website
  2. Teleological arguments, Standford University website
  3. Children see the world as designed
  4. Broun, Heywood (1941). Collected Edition of Heywood Broun (New York: Harcourt, Brace), p. 26. Retrieved from GoogleBooks on May 26, 2015.