Last modified on 22 September 2020, at 18:14

Anita Hill

Anita Hill, born July 30, 1956 (age 64), is a law professor at Brandeis University. She is best known for her testimony during United States Senate confirmation hearings on Clarence Thomas's appointment to the US Supreme Court. The Senate rejected her claims of harassment and voted to confirm Thomas in 1991.

Sen. Joseph Biden, chairman of the Judiciary Committee, called for extended hearings to delay a vote on Thomas and accommodate her last-minute allegations with televised hearings that traumatized the country. Biden told Sen. Arlen Specter that “It was clear to me from the way she was answering the questions, [Hill] was lying” about the central theme of her testimony. Biden used homophobia, allegations by a Republican Senator that Anita Hill had "certain proclivities" to discredit her testimony, to attack Hill's critics while at the same time fight the nomination of an uppity Black. Biden has been widely criticized for his racist, sexist, and bigotted handling of the hearings.[1][2]

Hill's testimony focused on Thomas's alleged comments years earlier, when he was her supervisor at the Department of Education, and later at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). Hill claimed to have been sexually harassed, but never explained why she continued to work for Thomas, transferring with him from the Dept. of Education to the EEOC, or why she never reported the alleged harassment until the Republican president, George H.W. Bush nominated a black man to the Supreme Court. Ultimately 58 percent of Americans believed Thomas while only 24 percent believed Hill.[3]

Thomas said he would rather have been the victim of an assassin's bullet than suffer what Anita Hill did to him.[4] Journalist David Brock outed Anita Hill as a lesbian who was trying to further the far left pro-abortion feminist and homosexual agendas.[5][6] Biden did not allow corroborating witnesses of Hill's testimony.[7] The small cadre of homosexual civil service system employees were kept out of the hearing.[8] Brock later came out himself as a gay heroin addict and was hired by George Soros to run Media Matters.[9]

Thomas would not promise to uphold Roe v. Wade. Democrats were outraged that a Republican president would nominate a conservative African-American role model for Black youths to the Supreme Court. Barack Obama oversaw a registration drive of 125,000 black voters in a primary challenge to popular incumbent Sen. Alan Dixon, a Democrat who voted to confirm a Black Supreme Court Justice, and elected far leftist Carol Moseley-Braun in his place.[10] It was Obama's first foray into marrying feminism and the homosexual agenda to the Black civil rights movement in electoral politics.

Hill described her private conversation with Joe Biden shortly before he entered the 2020 presidential election as "deeply unsatisfying."[11]

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