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Culture of the United States

273 bytes added, 01:59, 2 February 2018
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The concept of [[Liberty]], even to this day, is an intricate part of the unique culture of America, and forms the bulk of what became known as [[American Exceptionalism]].
In 1854, in response to a petition to abolish the position of chaplain in the Army and in Congress, a committee report of [[Congress]] noted the distinct [[Christian]] character of the country: "Had the people, during the Revolution, had a suspicion of any attempt to war against Christianity, that Revolution would have been strangled in its cradle. At the time of the adoption of the Constitution and the Amendments, the universal sentiment was that Christianity should be encouraged, not any one sect."<ref>[https://books.google.com/books?id=zaoFAAAAQAAJ&pg=PP58 Reports of Committees of the House of Representatives Made during the first session of the thirty-third congress]</ref><ref>[https://books.google.com/books?id=9R1cAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA320 Christian Life and Character of the Civil Institutions of the United States: Developed in the Official and Historical Annals of the Republic]</ref><ref>[https://books.google.com/books?id=vPldDQAAQBAJ&pg=PT28 Original Intent: The Courts, the Constitution, and Religion]</ref>
==History==
* [[Limited government]]
* [[Self-governance]]
 
==Bibliography==
* Lutz, Donald S. ''The Origins of American Constitutionalism'' (1988), Chronicles the influences that led to early American cultural beliefs
==References==
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