Physician

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A physician is a person who is licensed to practice medicine. Physicians take care of the human body and its ailments. A modern physician undertakes a course of study at an institution of higher learning such as a university. In the U.S. a physician earns the degree Doctor of Medicine (MD) or Doctor of Osteopathy (DO) after 4 years of graduate study. In the U.K., Ireland and most Commonwealth countries the basic medical degree is of 6 or 7 years of duration. In recent times a postgraduate 4-year degree has been introduced.

In general, all physicians who wish to gain certification (US) or registration (UK) must undertake extra training and or residency. In the UK and most of the Commonwealth the term physician is used for a person who has undertaken around 8 more years of study and training above their university degree. Physicians in this instance are considered to be specialist[1].

An article published by The University of Chicago Chronicle that discussed this study, stated that 76 percent of physicians believe in God while being highly educated.[1] Moreover, another study by the Journal of General Internal Medicine, found that 90 percent of doctors in the United States attend religious services at least occasionally as compared with 81% of the general U.S. population.[1]

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References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Survey on physicians’ religious beliefs shows majority faithful. The University of Chicago. Retrieved on 2007–10–18. “The first study of physician religious beliefs has found that 76 percent of doctors believe in God and 59 percent believe in some sort of afterlife. The survey, performed by researchers at the University and published in the July issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine, found that 90 percent of doctors in the United States attend religious services at least occasionally, compared to 81 percent of all adults.”

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